The Foundation of International Labour Organization A Condensed Background for its Backdrop

Document Type: Original Article

Author

Assistant Professor,Faculty of Law and Political Science, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran

Abstract

The conquest of Constantinople in 1453 by the Ottomans compelled Europeans to open new routes for their high profited trade with the East which had been fundamentally damaged. Their sea voyages reached them to unknown spaces for profit-making on both east and west side of the Atlantic. The Mercantilism was momentum and at the same time a theorizing device for their endeavours. Slaves, as commercial commodities and the labour-force, were of the greatest profit and played an undeniable role for the industrialization, the genesis of the Industrial Revolution, and the misery of workers as one of its by-products. In 1919 International Labour Organization was founded as an evolutionary response to the dreadful conditions of workers, and for the strengthening of weakened bases of the liberal economic system.The Conditions and weakness had roots in European expansions and developments. The foundation was also a reactionary measure against the expansion of social uprisings all over the Europe and America, which might be led to the downfall of liberal governments in industrialized countries by adopting the Russian Revolution model.

Keywords


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